Managing your dog’s weight

Has your dog been getting too many treats and oversized portions lately? Managing your dog’s weight is extremely important when it comes to maintaining a healthy  lifestyle for your pet.

Research shows that two thirds of dogs are overweight and the role of nutrition plays a vital part in ensuring your dog stays healthy and that their weight is managed. As PAWrents, it is important for  you keep an eye on your dog’s weight and monitor the daily intake of food. A dog will mostly always eat all of what you put in front of them.

The health risks associated with obesity in dogs can be serious. They can include: damage to joints and bones, heart disease, hypertension, difficulty breathing, decreased stamina, heat intolerance, decreased liver function, and decreased quality and length of life. You can check our dog weight management chart to see what bracket your dog falls into.

The first step to managing your dog’s weight is knowing how much you are feeding them. Always measure your dogs food at every meal. That way, you know how much to feed in order to reduce their intake if required.

Keep track of snacks and treats, and reduce those too when your dog needs to decrease on the calories. Just like people, dogs lose weight by consuming fewer calories than they burn. Therefore, to lose weight, a dog needs to eat less and exercise more.

What causes weight gain?

Weight gain is generally caused by too many calories eaten and not enough used up. Older dogs that are less active – sometimes due to health issues like arthritis – are more likely to gain weight, and may need changes to their diet to reflect their lifestyle.

Certain  larger breeds are more likely to overeat, (golden retrievers, labradors, basset hounds and Rottweilers) and are prone to weight gain.

 

Signs that might tell you that your dog is overweight

-You need to loosen your dog’s collar

-You can no longer see your dog’s waist or feel their ribs

-Their tummy hangs down when they are standing

-They have trouble walking

-They move more slowly than they used to

-They regularly become short of breath, and pant more than they used to

-They have become bad tempered

-They sleep more than usual

Ask the Experts

A dogs’ weight can be a tricky one because no two dogs are the same; if you are worried, it is always worthwhile contacting your vet. They will be able to determine whether your dog is overweight, and to offer the best dietary and exercise.

 

 

 

Competition T&C’s

Valentines Competition – Feb – 2021 – Win a GAIN Pet Nutrition hamper.

  1. The promoter is Glanbia Foods Ireland Limited t/a Glanbia Ireland (“Glanbia”), having its principal place of business at Kilkenny Industrial & Business Park, Purcellsinch, Co. Kilkenny (“the Promoter”).
  2. The “WIN a GAIN Pet Nutrition Hamper” (“the Competition”) closing date is the 15th Febuary 2021
  3. Entries received after the 15th Febuary 2021 will not be eligible for the competition.
  4. Entry into the Competition will be deemed to be a full unconditional acceptance of the terms and conditions.
  5. The Promoter reserves the right to amend, suspend or terminate these terms and conditions, the Competition rules and the Competition.
  6. This competition is open to residents of the Republic of Ireland only.
  7. No cash alternative will be offered in lieu of the prize.
  8. The prize is non-transferable and non-refundable.
  9. The “WIN a GAIN Pet Nutrition Hamper (“the prize”) consists of the following: anyone who signs up to the GAIN Pet Nutrition Database
  10. All entries received for the Competition will be determined valid by Glanbia Ireland.
  11. The winners of the competition will be randomly selected from a database of eligible entrants.
  12. The winners will be contacted within 72 hours of being selected.
  13. The allocation of the prize will be to individuals only, no group or syndicates are eligible for entry to this competition.
  14. The promoter reserves the right to alter the specifications of the prize should that specified be unavailable for reasons beyond its control. Any alternative prize(s) given will be of equal value.
  15. These terms and condition shall be governed and constructed in accordance with the laws of Ireland.
  16. In the event of any dispute regarding the rules, conduct or results of the Competition the decision of the Promoter will be final.
  17. By entering this Competition winners consent to their name, hometown and likeness for the purpose of advertising, promotion or publicity in any media without additional compensation and prize winners agree to take part in such related promotional activities as the Promoter may require.
  18. Employees of Glanbia plc, Glanbia Ireland or any associated company of Glanbia plc/Glanbia Ireland and their immediate families, persons connected with the competition/prize draw and their immediate families i.e. prize sponsors, are not eligible to enter the Competition.
  19. The Promoter will not accept any responsibility whatsoever for any death, injury or other damage, loss or expense arising as a result of taking a prize save where such damage or loss is caused by the Promoter’s negligence.
  20. Prizes not claimed within the specified time limit will be deemed to have been forfeited and the Promoter may dispose of such prize without liability to the winner.
  21. Any person considered to be in disregard of these rules will be disqualified.
  22. The Promoter reserves the right to disqualify any contestant for any reason in its sole discretion.

Switching Feed

Dogs do not get bored of food normally, but there are times when the need to switch food comes for different reasons such as moving through the life stages (a puppy to an adult, an adult to a senior product, a light product for dogs prone to weight gain).

When introducing your dog to a new food, you will need to gradually transition between the old and the new by mixing the existing food with the new food over a period of 7 days.

Why should I change feed? If you notice that your four – legged friend has a sensitive stomach and itchy skin or loose stools, perhaps a Grain – Free alternative would be an option. GAIN KINDNESS range is our a grain-free offering that comes brimming with select meats, vegetables, fruits and botanicals. Expertly formulated without grain, it naturally provides everything a thriving dog needs – in one complete, sensitive and hypoallergenic dog food.

Browse the GAIN Kindness Range HERE

If your dog is on the GAIN SMALLDOGS PUPPY or GAIN BIGDOGS PUPPY, it may be time to switch to our GAIN SMALLDOGS ADULT or GAIN BIGDOGS ADULT. Our puppy products have extra protein which help puppies grow big and strong, whereas our adult ranges allow your dog to maintain a healthy lifestyle with our expert-formulated food for adult dogs.

If you notice your dog is becoming overweight or is in their senior years, it may be time to try switch to GAIN Senior/Light. This product contains L-carnatine to manage weight control. It also includes a precise blend of Glucosamine, MSM and Omega oils to help with joint care and mobility in the older dog.

Browse the GAIN Elite Range HERE

 

Christmas opening hours and delivery cut off for online orders

To ensure timely deliveries and to avoid disappointment over the holiday period, please ensure orders are made in accordance with the below recommendations.

Online Delivery Times:

Order Type Pre Christmas Delivery Cut Off 
Standard orders Thursday Dec 17th  (Noon)
Non Standard (Hazchem, bulky items & pallet deliveries) Thursday Dec 17th (Noon)

Normal delivery service resumes after the 4th of January 2021. 

Branch Opening and Closing Times:

Date Time
Christmas Eve Half Day
Christmas Day Closed
Saturday 26th Stephens Day Closed
Sunday 27th Closed
Monday 28th Closed
Tuesday 29th Open
Wednesday 30th Open
Thursday 31st Open
Friday Jan 1st New Year’s Day Closed
Saturday Jan 2nd Open

Normal trading hours resume on Monday the 4th of January 2021.

 

Please check with your local branch as some times may vary depending on branch location.

Customer Service Centre Lo-call 1890 321 321

Christmas Eve Closed
Christmas Day Closed
Saturday 26th Stephens Day Closed
Sunday 27th Closed
Monday 28th Closed
Tuesday 29th 8.30am – 6pm
Wednesday 30th 8.30am – 6pm
Thursday 31st 8.30am – 6pm
Friday Jan 1st New Year’s Day Closed
Saturday Jan 2nd 9am – 1pm

Give Them Kindness This Christmas

GAIN Pet Nutrition are delighted to launch our #GiftofGiving Christmas campaign on our Facebook page on Monday 30th November. We want you to nominate a chosen shelter or charity and give them the #GiftofKindness this Christmas. All you have to do is go to our Facebook page , go to the comments section on the competition post and comment your chosen charity or shelter. We will randomly select eight nominees and they will receive the #GiftofKindness this Christmas.

As Ireland’s leading animal nutrition company we believe that every dog has a right to lifelong health and wellness. Each winning charity/shelter will receive free bags of our GAIN Kindness range to help them over the Christmas period.

Robert O’Sullivan GAIN Pet Nutrition said “GAIN are delighted once again to run our ‘Gift of Giving’ campaign this December for shelters and charities around the country. 2020 has been a particularly difficult year for these organisations and we all owe them a huge amount of gratitude for the fantastic work they carry out 365 days a year. We hope that our nutritional support will go some way to help ease the financial burden they are experiencing, and that it helps one and all to the Christmas they deserve. We look forward again to working closely and offering our support in 2021 to these selfless organisations”.

Managing your dog’s weight

Has your dog been getting to many treats and oversized portions lately? Managing your dog’s weight is extremely important when it comes to maintaining a healthy weight and lifestyle for your pet.

Research shows that two thirds of dogs are overweight and the role of nutrition plays a vital part in ensuring your dog stays healthy and their weight is managed. It is important that as owners you keep an eye on your dog’s weight and monitor the daily intake of food. A dog will 9 times out of 10 eat all of what you give them which puts the onus more on the owner to manage your pets weight.

The health risks associated with obesity in dogs are very serious. They can include damage to joints and bones, heart disease, hypertension, difficulty breathing, decreased stamina, heat intolerance, decreased liver function, and decreased quality and length of life. You can check the chart above to see what bracket your dog falls into.

The first step to managing your dog’s weight is knowing how much you are feeding him. Always measure his food at every meal. That way, you know how much to feed in order to reduce his intake. Keep track of snacks and treats, and reduce those too when your dog needs to go on a diet. Just like people, dogs lose weight by consuming fewer calories than they burn. Therefore, to lose weight, a dog needs to eat less and exercise more.

What causes weight gain?

Weight gain is generally caused by too many calories eaten and not enough used up. Older dogs that are less active – sometimes due to health issues like arthritis – are more likely to gain weight, and may need changes to their diet to reflect their lifestyle. Certain breeds with tendencies to overeat, (golden retrievers, Labradors, basset hounds and Rottweilers) are prone to weight gain and may need regular monitoring of their weight to keep things under control.

Signs that might tell you that your dog is overweight

You need to loosen your dog’s collar

You can no longer see your dog’s waist or feel their ribs

Their tummy hangs down when they are standing

They have trouble walking

They move more slowly than they used to

They regularly become short of breath, and pant more than they used to

They have become bad tempered

They sleep more than usual

Ask the Experts

Dogs’ weight can be a tricky one because no two dogs are the same; if you are worried, it is always worth contacting your vet. They will be able to determine whether your dog is overweight, and to offer the best dietary and exercise advice if they are.

What is the ideal weight for my dog?

The graph above can help you in determining whether your dog is overweight or not however, there is no one ideal weight for all dogs. The optimum weight depends on your pet’s size and breed, and your vet can advise you on the ideal weight for your dog.

2021 CALENDAR COMPETITION

GAIN Pet Nutrition and The Irish Kennel Club are delighted to launch the 2021 calendar competition which will start taking entries as of June 15th.

This year has been very different for everyone and while we know that there have been many challenges, we hope that you are getting to enjoy spending some extra time with your families and pets.

Our pets have played a crucial role in helping us through our new routines and while we are staying apart, they are helping us keep it together.

This year’s calendar competition theme will be ‘Keeping Us Together’.

The competition will run until the 30th August with 13 finalists being chosen. There will be an overall winner who will be the 2021 calendar cover photo, a year’s supply of GAIN Pet Nutrition food, a canvas print of their photo and €500 cash. The runner up will be our January image and receive 6 months’ supply of GAIN Pet Nutrition food, a canvas print of their photo and €250 cash with the twelve other finalists will receive a large bag of GAIN Pet Nutrition food, a canvas print of their photo and €100 cash.

We are also excited to announce that PetBond has come on board as the 2020 co-sponsor.

PetBond is Ireland’s leading online platform where safe, ethical and trusted breeders can now easily find forever homes for their valued puppies. Managed by vets, supporting IKC breeders is at the core of PetBond as we together, lead the way in improving animal welfare. You can find out more information by clicking here .

How To Enter:

To enter, simply send your photo by email to gainphotocompetition@glanbia.ie. Include your name, address and contact number.

The photo submitted must be larger than 1MB in size

A full list of Terms & Conditions can be found here. 

GAIN Pet Calendar Competition 2020 Terms & Conditions

We are delighted to launch our calendar competition in association with the Irish Kennel Club, the competition has kindly been sponsored by Petbond.

The overall prizefund is worth over €3000! Simply email the photo to gainphotocompetition@glanbia.ie to enter and your dog could feature in the Irish Kennel Club/GAIN Pet Nutrition Calendar for 2021.

See T&Cs below

  1. The promoter of this Competition is Glanbia Foods Ireland Limited t/a Glanbia Agribusiness, Purcellsinch, Dublin Road, Co. Kilkenny (the “Promoter”).
  2. The Competition will commence on the 15th of June 2020 and will run up until 23.59.59 on the closing date of the 30th August 2020.
  3. Entry into the Competition is free and no purchase is necessary.
  4. Entry into the Competition shall be deemed to be a full and unconditional acceptance of these terms and conditions.
  5. The Promoter reserves the right to amend, suspend or terminate these terms and conditions and the Competition at any time.
  6. Eligible entrants must enter by emailing a photograph (minimum size 1MB) to gainphotocompetition@glanbia.ie. Entrants should include their own name, address and telephone number.
  7. All images submitted must be the work of the individual submitting them, it is the responsibility of each entrant to ensure that any images they submit have been taken with the permission of the subject and do not infringe the copyright of any third party or any laws. Entrants must warrant that the photograph they are submitting is their own work and that they own the copyright for it.
  8. Copyright in all images submitted for this competition remains with the respective entrants. However, in consideration of their providing the Competition, each entrant grants a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual licence to the promoter to feature any or all of the submitted images in any of their publications, their websites and/or in any promotional material connected to this competition.
  9. Only one entry (photo) per person. Late, illegible, incomplete, defaced or corrupt entries will not be accepted.
  10. The winning entrant will be selected from valid entries received by the closing date of 30th August by an independent judge and the independent judge’s decision is final.
  11. The winner will have 28 days to claim the prize. If the prize is not claimed within this time limit, it will be deemed to have been forfeited.
  12. If the winner is not able, for any reason, to accept the prize, or cannot be contacted, the Promoter reserves the right to award the prize to another entrant.
  13. The prizes for this competition are:
  • 1st Place – Photo to feature on the cover of the calendar, €500, GAIN Elite pet food and a canvas print.
  • 2nd Place – Photo will feature in calendar, €250 & GAIN Elite pet food and a canvas print.
  • 11 Runner Up prizes – Photo will feature in calendar, €100 & GAIN Elite pet food and a canvas print
  1. The prize is non-transferable and non-refundable and there will be no substitute.
  2. The winner will be notified by the Promoter via email or telephone.
  3. The winners will be notified within 10 days’ of the closing date.
  4. In the event of any dispute regarding the rules, conduct or results of the Competition, the decision of the Promoter will be final and no correspondence will be entered into.
  5. Any person considered by the Promoter to be in disregard of these terms and conditions will be disqualified. The Promoter reserves the right to disqualify any entrant for any reason at its sole discretion.
  6. The entrants’ personal data will only be held for the purpose of the Competition and will not be used for any other purpose without their prior permission. By accepting the prize, the winner grants the Promoter the right to use and publish his/her name and picture in such media as the Promoter may choose (including but not limited to the internet) for advertising and promotional purposes without additional consideration.
  7. The Promoter accepts no responsibility for entrants taking part in the Competition or availing of the prize and they do so fully at their own risk.
  8. These terms and conditions shall be governed and construed in accordance with the laws of Ireland. Entrants submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of Ireland.
  9. All enquires relating to this Competition can be made for one month after the close of this Competition by emailing info@gainanimalnutrition.com.

 

 

Heading back to work? Get your dog ready for their new routine!

We have all spent a little or a lot of extra time at home recently and with that we have had a great opportunities to get to know our pets and spend more quality time with them. It has been great, hasn’t it?

With lockdown easing and restrictions being somewhat lifted, people are finding themselves getting back into some form of routine and with that, perhaps your dog who was once fine with being left to its own devices, is now feeling a little bit anxious about being left alone.

Anxiety is a common issue with dogs, more so than you would think. There are different types of anxiety such as fear and separation.

Now that your four- legged friend is more accustom to having you home, they don’t want you to leave.

There can be a number of symptoms to watch out for such as drooling, panting, digging holes, restlessness, aggression, howling or whining and potential ‘accidents’ amongst others.

Some helpful and simple tips to reduce separation anxiety include:

Training – This is not the routine your dog has been used to over the past few months. Begin by leaving them alone for a small amount of time and then build that time into longer periods.

Normality – Do not make a big fuss of leaving or coming home, there should be no long goodbyes or extravagant hellos.

Distraction – Give your dog a treat or a toy as you are leaving and take it off them once you come home. A long lasting chew toy may do the trick.

Familiarity – Leave out an item of clothing you have recently worn so your dog will have comfort in your scent and will be more relaxed.

Quite Time – We all need our space, including your pooch. While you are at home, let them sleep in another room so they can have their quiet time too.

If you are concerned that your dog is not themselves, we would always recommend seeking veterinary advice to rule out any possible underlying health issues.

When you do have the time to spend with your dog, ensure that you are engaging and interacting with them. Go for long walks/jogs, play fetch etc. this will ensure they are really tired at the end of the day but also really happy.

Your Puppy’s Journey

The first months – Getting a dog is like getting a new member of the family. The dog will have needs such as walks, play, affection and training. In all likelihood, owning a dog is not the only commitment that you have, so you need to work the dog’s schedule around that of your own.

At ten weeks old, you should take your new puppy to the vet, where they will check the overall health of the puppy and you will be advised on the right timings for vaccinations and worming doses.

The first few months is the time where boundaries are set and training should begin. A variety of experiences early on will build to a respectful and agreeable adult dog later in their life. As the owner, you must ensure the puppy is aware of their surroundings and allow them contact with children, other dogs and other animals early in their lives.

A feeding pattern should be identified early and any special requirements for nutrition should be met. Our GAIN Elite range offers an advance nutrition specifically for big breed puppy’s and small breed puppy’s. However, if your puppy has a special requirement such as showing signs of itchy or sensitive skin, we also have a grain free option known as our ‘Kindness’ range that could be a suitable alternative.

Puberty – This is a short phase and will last between one and size weeks. Puberty starts roughly at size months and can often lead to your dog behaving badly and not wanting to learn new things. During puberty, you should be persistent with the education program and continue with training.

The Adult Dog – You will know when your dog has finished puberty when a male lifts his leg to urinate or when a female goes into heat for the first time. This generally occurs within seven months up to a year.

The Senior Dog – Dogs tend to show signs of ageing between the ages of eight and ten, they will become less active and have a slower metabolism, Many older dogs show signs of weight gain, become grey and experience a deterioration of sight and hearing.

Each stage of a dog’s life cycle requires a different feeding regime. The typical feeding guidelines are generally displayed on the back of the pack/bag of dog food.

Making your puppy part of the family

Balancing Commitments It is imperative that you train your dog to ensure that you and those who live with you have a peaceful time. Every dog should have a few basic commands such as sit, down, stop, bed and stop talking. A badly behaved dog is difficult to live with, and if a dog doesn’t understand what it is being asked to do it can be very stressful. Dogs work best with clear guidelines of what they are expected to do.

Basic Training Before you take your puppy out, introduce your puppy to his collar and lead. Start with a light collar and let them get used to wearing it on its own. Do not buckle it too tightly – just enough to stop it slipping over his head. First, accustom them to the lead rather than trying to make them walk with it on.

Taking Your Puppy Out The lead is essential for keeping your puppy under control in public places and for the basic training every young dog must be given. Coax them to follow you by praise but if he tries to get away just hold the lead until he realises there is no escape.

Once your dog is used to the collar, you can begin the basic training, designed to turn them into a quiet, respectful and social animal.

The Basic Rules Make sure that the approach to training is consistent. Reward them with a show of affection and by stroking them when they do well. Do not punish a dog for not obeying a command. Simply withhold the reward or they will associate the command with punishment. Keep the lessons short and make it fun for the dog to learn.

Training a dog needs patience; it is useful to use short words of command with vowels that sound clearly different. The first four essentials are HEEL – SIT – COME – DOWN.

Knowing Your Dog It is vital that everyone in the household is able to tell when the dog is happy, afraid, nervous and angry.

Make sure your dog has safe toys to play with to stop them getting bored. It is important that a dog’s bed is far away from the front door as it gives the dog more time to make a decision on new visitors at the door, minimising the chances of any unwanted aggression.

Top Training Tips

  • Train your dog in general obedience so that you have control at all times
  • Feed your dog at regular times and keep to a routine. Do not give snacks or treats between meals
  • Feed your dog from their own dish, and keep away from dishes that you would use you’re your human family members.
  • Keep your dog on a lead anywhere near the road, or where there are farm animals
  • Do not allow your dog to ‘do their business’ on walkways, buildings, lawns and gardens or open spaces where children play. Always clean up after them.
  • Do not allow your dog to be noisy and disturb the neighbours
  • Provide your dog with their own bed. Don’t let them sleep in yours.
  • Never take your dog into a food shop
  • Keep your dog clean and regularly groomed
  • Register your pet as a patient and yourself as a client with the veterinary surgeon of your choice.
  • Make proper arrangements for the care of your pet when you are going on holidays.